Russian newspaper in Australia
Русская газета в Австралии. Издаётся с 1950 года

Лекции Ирины Данн о русской литературе в Художественной галерее НЮУ

24 November 2017

Ирина Данн приглашает читателей "Единения", интересующихся литературой, посетить цикл её лекций в Art Gallery NSW, где она расскажет о Пастернаке и Аксенове, о Чехове, Петрушевской и Улицкой, о Булгакове и Пелевине . Лекции на английском языке.

Для русской общины Ирина предлагает бесплатное посещение. Для этого при входе необходимо назвать имя Irina Dunn.

 THE EPIC NOVEL: PASTERNAK AND AKSYONOV Irina Dunn
FRIDAY 27 AND SATURDAY 28 OCTOBER

Boris Pasternak’s beloved book Doctor Zhivago and Vasily Aksyonov’s
Generations of Winter share not only an epic world view that reaches
across generations, but a similar humanist perspective that raises
questions of personal loyalty, social responsibility and ethical concerns.
Both writers foreground their characters against a tumultuous and
repressive Russian political period which threatens to overwhelm them
and rob them of hope and even of life itself.

 THE RUSSIAN SHORT STORY: CHEKHOV, PETRUSHEVSKAYA
AND ULITSKAYA Irina Dunn
FRIDAY 17 AND SATURDAY 18 NOVEMBER

Quite apart from his renown as a playwright, Anton Chekhov is regarded
as one of the greatest short story writers of all time. His mastery of the
form arises from his spare style and sense of the dramatic in everyday
life. In contemporary times, Ludmilla Petrushevskaya and Ludmila
Ulitskaya are natural successors to Chekhov in their command of
short-form fiction, in their psychological insights into human nature,
and in the popularity of their works with Russian readers.

 THE SATIRIC VOICE IN RUSSIAN FICTION: BULGAKOV
AND PELEVIN Irina Dunn
FRIDAY 24 AND SATURDAY 25 NOVEMBER

The Russian satiric tradition was realised in Soviet times by Mikhail
Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita, which describes a visit by the devil
to an atheistic Moscow. Along the way, he encounters the Christlike figure
of the Master and his devoted acolyte Margarita, and all hell breaks loose.
In the post-Soviet period, Victor Pelevin takes up the satiric sword in
novels such as Babylon, in which he castigates modern Russian society for
succumbing to the blandishments of the advertising world and materialism